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What is it?

The GRFC is a global food security analysis that enhances coordination between various partners and informs decision–making on resource allocation, planning and implementation of humanitarian and resilience actions.

The report aims to instigate and inform better decision-making to increase resilience for the food security of the world’s most vulnerable people and “to ensure that no one is left behind” (High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development, 2016).

The report is designed to:

  • Summarize available data and analysis from global, regional and national food security monitoring systems;
  • Add value by bringing together this complex data and information to provide an accurate, comprehensive, transparent assessment of existing food security analysis;
  • Identify key data and analytical gaps; and
  • Drive improved coordination and informed planning and implementation for humanitarian and resilience-building initiatives.

Through the Integrated Phase Classification (IPC) and the Cadre Harmonisé (CH) – its key information sources – the GFRC provides in-depth analysis of countries that are chronically vulnerable to food crises and have large proportions of their population facing acute severity of food insecurity.

Main findings of Global Report 2018

Globally, in 2017 an estimated 124 million people in 51 countries are currently facing Crisis food insecurity or worse (the equivalent of IPC/CH Phase 3 or above). Conflict and insecurity continued to be the primary drivers of food insecurity in 18 countries, where almost 74 million food-insecure people remain in need of urgent assistance.

Last year’s report identified 108 million people in Crisis food security or worse across 48 countries.  A comparison of the 45 countries included in both editions of the report reveals an increase of 11 million people – an 11 percent rise – in the number of food-insecure people across the world who require urgent humanitarian action.

Now in its third edition, the report is not a UN-owned publication but rather a public good, for use by those committed to achieving the objective of minimizing human suffering and eventually ending hunger. Prepared collectively by 12 leading global and regional institutions under the umbrella of the Food Security Information Network, the report provides thematic, country-specific, and trends analysis of food crises around the world.

Additional information

Monitoring food security in countries with conflict situations: A joint FAO/WFP update for the United Nations Security Council (January 2018)

This report provides an overview of the food security situation in conflict-affected countries and to provide regular monitoring of the food security situation in the countries currently being monitored by the United Nations Security Council (UNSC). The analysis takes into consideration the complexity of conflict and illustrates its impact on the four pillars of food insecurity: availability, access, utilization and stability. The negative impact of conflict on food security, nutrition and agriculture is uncontested and globally recognized.

Monitoring food security in countries with conflict situations: A joint FAO/WFP update for the United Nations Security Council (January 2018)

Monitoring food security in countries with conflict situations: A joint FAO/WFP update for the United Nations Security Council (June 2017)

This report aims to provide an overview of the food security situation in conflict-affected countries and to provide regular monitoring of the food security situation in the countries currently being monitored by the United Nations Security Council (UNSC). The analysis takes into consideration the complexity of conflict and illustrates its impact on the four pillars of food insecurity: availability, access, utilization and stability.

Monitoring food security in countries with conflict situations: A joint FAO/WFP update for the United Nations Security Council (June 2017)